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Decorative Glass

Together Again, Alleluia

In the end, the best part was just being back together. It sounds corny, I know, but Glass TEXpo, held last week in San Antonio was a landmark event in many ways. It was the first live event in the glass industry since the pandemic hit. It offered just under 1,000 attendees a chance to visit with more than 100 vendors and choose from 10 power-packed seminars. It also showcases its sponsors, the Texas Glass Association and USGlass magazine. But mostly, it was about just being back together. “I really don’t know what to expect,” said Mark Imbrock, president of EDTM, while he was setting up for the show. “I’m… Read More »

More Trends from Glasstec

Glasstec has always been an awesome show from a product standpoint. In the last few years, and under the direction of Birgit Horn, the event has grown to include even more new technologies and their applications. It also now involves some of the best glazing-related academics in the world. In addition to seeing the latest in new products, the show makes it easy to glimpse the future, as well. So, against that backdrop, here are some of the up and coming trends I saw to watch for in the future. More than an ounce of prevention: New technology is focused on very specific problems that commonly occur in glass. There… Read More »

Don’t Trend on Me

The amount of change in the world, and the pace at which it occurs, continues to amaze me. Take trends for example. Trends are no longer things, they’re actions. So here’s my top five list of what’s “trending” in the glass world of the future: 1 – Acoustical purity: As restaurant critics begin to rate the amount of noise in the establishments they review, and concert halls start to publish their acoustical ratings, we can see how important noise, or the lack of it, has become. This new emphasis will be true in the glass industry, as well. The importance of acoustical ratings, and acoustical glass products, will continue to… Read More »

BAU’s a Wow

Today was my first time ever attending the BAU (which means “Build” in German) show, which is being held at the Munich Fairgrounds this week. I’d been told for years, and by a number of people, that “you really should visit BAU.” Well, after just one day here, I understand why. Why? Because while glasstec—held every other year in Dusseldorf—focuses on all types of glass manufacturing and processes, BAU is where you see the glass in action in all sorts of products. And because it also showcases a variety of glass-related products, including steel and facades, BAU is where you get to see everything, from building facades to high-end residential… Read More »

Are We There Yet?

bunnypanckaes

The amazing growth in the sale and use of decorative glass over the past three years led me to wonder where the market is in terms of its maturity. Given all the new technologies and rapid growth, I don’t think we are quite there yet. There’s lots of business to be had in many different places throughout the United States. To check out my theory, I looked not only at what types of decorative category glass was being made, but where. The results tell an interesting story of manufacturers being concentrated in a number of areas throughout the country: View Where the Decorative Fabricators Are/Regional in a full screen map… Read More »

The Leadership Thing

It really is the most elusive of qualities. It can’t be taught, yet it isn’t genetic either. So where do the qualities that make a great leader come from? And how do we get them? I’ve been pondering this question a lot in the past few weeks, especially because of an interview I recently saw on the TODAY show. The interview was in advance of this weekend’s opening of a movie about his called “Captain Phillips.” In the interview, the real-life captain of the Maersk-Alabama, who had been kidnapped by Somali pirates, talked about leadership. But the captain, Captain Richard Phillips of New England, did not respond to the question… Read More »

Please Help

Over the course of the past week, I have learned some sadly amazing and horrific stories of loss as a result of the hurricane that walloped the Northeast last week. And my most beloved glass industry, we have got to step up. I have heard tale after tale of people who have lost all as a result of the storm and it’s heart-breaking. Consider this email we received today from Mark Knapp of the BL Group who said: “How can we … help these folks? There are glass shops that have lost everything !!!!!!! There were a about 6-7 glass shops wiped out in storm and maybe more. These are… Read More »

Top Five Trends in Glass at the AIA Show

Never one to write long if I can write short, here are the top five glass trends from the AIA 2012 convention, which just ended Saturday: 1. Dynamic and solar control glass a-go-go:  The primary manufacturers were out in semi-force (no AGC, no Cardinal) touting new and advanced products for solar control and energy efficiency. PPG Industries and Pleotint teamed up to present Suntuitive. It changes shading based on temperature and is easy to install, according to PPG’s Joanne Funyak;  Honeymooners Saint-Gobain and Sage Electrochomic were discussing a future of joint products (though they still had separate booths). Saint-Gobain also displayed electrochromic microlouvers available with both fixed and dynamic daylight control;… Read More »

The Story is Always in the Glass–and Happy New Year too!

You know, sometimes it takes a customer to remind you what you are doing wrong. And if you read this blog regularly you know I will do so when I am and hope that it not too frequently. So it is with humble heart that I bow to Earnest Thompson of Guardian Industries, who reminded me of my own motto–that the story is always in the glass. See our robust editorial staff of eight has been running around trying to ferret out the last stories or come up with those hard-hitting investigative pieces and we missed …. yes, I must say missed …. the biggest stories of the holiday season…. Read More »

Super-Sized Heroes and Super-Sized Mistakes

Oops. I just had to say it because it is the word of the week. But I forgot why. All kidding aside, the most memorable part of Rick Perry’s “senior moment” was not that it happened. Heck, it can happen to anyone at any age—especially under bright lights with a minor thing like the presidency at stake—but the surprising thing is how institutionalized the recovery from such a moment has become. Make a potentially campaign-ending gaffe? Get on all those early morning talk shows, be humble and contrite and let people know you are well aware you “stepped in it.” Be sure to deflect attention away from the actual comment… Read More »

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