Displaying posts tagged with

“glazing”

Hyalophobia

Do you know what Hyalophobia is? It’s also known as Hyelophobia or Nelophobia. In all my years in this business I never heard of it, until a Jeopardy answer (or question depending on your point) of “What is Nelophobia?” clued me a few weeks ago. Hyalophobia is an insidious disease and can be deadly, especially when it affects architects. And based on what I’m seeing we could be on the cusp of a pandemic if the glass industry doesn’t come to attention quickly. Hyalophobia is a fear of glass. (Nelophobia is more akin to fear of glass breakage and injury from glass, by the way.) It is synonymous with Hyelophobia… Read More »

5 Bad Things about More Work

The contract glazing business is very busy right now; both projects and backlogs are up. But, as with most things, for every upside, there is a downside. Here’s a short list of five not-so-good things that usually come when contract glazing companies’ business is up and contract glaziers are busy. They are the five “Bad Ls” of a healthy contract glazing market: Lengthy Leads: When business is good, lead times get longer. And, as the glass used in such projects is more performance-driven and less commodity-based, the number of manufacturers that supply it dwindles. So we are faced with an increased demand but no ability to provide increased supply. While… Read More »

Code Led

“You must have it, you must,” he said very authoritatively, though it came across tinged with hostility. “But I don’t want it, we don’t need it,” I fired back just as authoritatively, working to mask my own growing hostility. The “it” in question was a tiny little room in our new offices, and “he” was a general contractor who was going to give me a quote on doing the build-out of our new space. I wanted the little room gone, as it served no purpose and seemed overkill for a non-public building that was going to house 16 people on a regular basis. Then he threw the C word at me…. Read More »

Legal? Ethical?

The sad case of the professor from Slippery Rock, Pa., who came in contact with an old door at a sandwich shop in 2013 bears a closer look. The professor, Glen Brunken, tripped and fell through the glass door at Bob’s Sub and Sandwich Shop, suffering severe lacerations and trauma to his neck and head. He died later at a local hospital after succumbing to his injuries, and his wife, Cynthia, has since sued multiple parties for negligence. At first glance, it seems to simply be a case of an old door glazed long before anyone ever heard of 16CFR 1201 (the original CPSC Federal Safety Glazing Regulations), long before… Read More »

It’s Deja Vu on Deja Vu

Henry Taylor of Kawneer deep in architectural conversation at his company

What’s the popular culture definition of insanity? Doing things the same way and expecting different results. Well, glass industry plus annual AIA Convention = insanity because sometimes I just feel like Bill Murray in Ground Hog’s Day. Or at least I think so. I have never actually seen the movie all the way through, but I’ve caught enough pieces of it on cable to know it’s about a guy who keeps living the same day over and over, determined to make the outcome different, yet frustrated when he can’t. Yup, I’m Bill. Here’s why. Last year, in discussing the AIA ’13 show in Denver, I raised a familiar flag about… Read More »

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