Displaying posts tagged with

“glass”

D-Day

Were my dad still alive, yesterday would have been his 90th birthday. Though he passed away 13 years ago the day before his birthday, his lessons still teach me things every day. His favorite saying was “just do your best,” though he’d always followed it with a caveat. “If you are sure — really sure — you have done your best, then you should be satisfied,” he’d say. “Because you could not have done any better.” So, you can see why I often focus on that question. Did I do the best I could? If so, I should be at peace. And if not, I need to fix that for… Read More »

In the Beginning, There were Glass Doors

“So, what’s it like to be a woman in the glass industry?” My actual answer is that I don’t know. I’ve never been anything else. “What’s it like to be a woman in the glass industry now, compared to years ago?” Well, that one I can answer. You might know that I started in this industry barely out of my teens and have had the privilege of serving it for 40 years since. In the beginning, whether I was in a room of 50 or 500, I was almost always the only one lacking a Y chromosome. It felt weird for a while, and then it just felt normal. Math… Read More »

Vegas, in a Word

When you make your living reporting, as I often do, you strive to provide perfect descriptions and compelling stories. When you can do so in paragraphs, you feel good. When you do so in sentences, you feel pretty accomplished. And you hit the etymological jackpot when you find a perfect one-word description. I might have found it for the Glassbuild America (GBA) show that took place late last month in Las Vegas. It was distinct from any GBA show that had come before it. It was unique in appearance, feel, and how people interacted with each other. Las Vegas was,  in a word, different. First, the look of the event… Read More »

The Proof is in the Proof

I can’t imagine anyone who watched the children of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on TV not being moved by their determination to stop what happened from ever happening again. It was especially moving to see so many of the journalism students there convey their message with poise and grace beyond their years. I think of them, and the parishioners in the South Carolina and Texas churches who forgave their assailant, the first responders in Las Vegas and the parents at Sandy Hook who go forward despite their loss. At the same time, I draw inspiration from them, I am drained from sadness that such inspiration is born from tragedy—over and over again. This… Read More »

Hyalophobia

Do you know what Hyalophobia is? It’s also known as Hyelophobia or Nelophobia. In all my years in this business I never heard of it, until a Jeopardy answer (or question depending on your point) of “What is Nelophobia?” clued me a few weeks ago. Hyalophobia is an insidious disease and can be deadly, especially when it affects architects. And based on what I’m seeing we could be on the cusp of a pandemic if the glass industry doesn’t come to attention quickly. Hyalophobia is a fear of glass. (Nelophobia is more akin to fear of glass breakage and injury from glass, by the way.) It is synonymous with Hyelophobia… Read More »

Heart Songs

Next week is the annual AIA Conference in Orlando, Fla., so for the April issue of USGlass magazine, we’ve focused it on the intersection of glass and architecture—sometimes it results in a chaotic collision and, other times, a cacophony of innovative design. The glass and glazing community loves to grouse about architects—heck, we’ve even written articles about all their faults and foibles—but here’s a secret about architects we never share. I am breaking the glass industry code to tell you, but here goes: the glass industry secretly loves architects. Here are the top five reasons why: 1- For what they create with glass. We love architects for their ability to… Read More »

7 Great Gifts of Glass

USGlass magazine publisher Debra Levy is blogging at glass.com today. To read her blog “7 Great Gifts of Glass” from Tuesday, December 20, CLICK HERE.

5 Ways Trump Will Affect the Glass Industry

Photo / Daniel Huizinga

Triumph or Trumped? I suspect the way you answer that question will have a lot to do with how you voted in the election last Tuesday. While it’s NOT my place to comment on who won and who lost, it IS my job to provide what I believe the ramifications of that presidency will be on the glass and glazing industry. So here are my top five: 1 – Transportation construction: The good news is that a lot of money will be allocated for federal projects under an anticipated transportation bill. Trump has indicated he will be asking for $1 trillion dollars to rebuild the U.S. infrastructure. The bad news… Read More »

Day(quil) Tripper

Okay so I got hit with a very bad cold, so I am quasi-working, sometimes sleeping, from home today and it got me thinking about the glass industry’s equivalent of “How can I get the experience if no one will hire me?” The credit for the analogy actually goes to Dr. Helen Sanders of SageGlass, who spoke on a panel about innovation at the GlassCon Global Conference in Boston in July. The overriding theme of the discussion was the North American glass industry as innovators. Designers and architects had gently tried to heap a wad of guilt served on a cattle prod to our industry for not being more innovative…. Read More »

Philadelphia Freedom

Big glass is here to stay.

AIA is always a show of note—and innovation. In addition to the glass and metal products there, visitors also are exposed to building products such as living roofs and custom faucets. Everything from new types of software to bathtubs for bicycles (true) were displayed. Here are some of the top themes from the event: Mood of jubilation! Every industry member with whom I spoke was busy with work. The number of bids and contracts are up, and backlogs are higher than they have been in years. The buoyancy other building material industries had at last year’s AIA show has reached the glass industry. And this makes sense because glass is… Read More »

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