Displaying posts categorized under

Door and Window Manufacturer

What’s Essential Nowadays?

Throughout the pandemic through which we are living, there has been a lot of confusion and ignorance around who or what is considered “essential.” For companies, being considered essential has meant the difference between being able to stay open or be closed in some states. For individuals, it can determine when you will have access to the COVID-19 vaccine. So it was with all this in mind that I studied the Department of Homeland Security memo issued December 16, 2020 titled “Advisory Memorandum on Ensuring Essential Critical Infrastructure Workers’ Ability to Work During the COVID-19 Response.” The memo details which workers, by function, are considered essential during the pandemic. This… Read More »

More Trends from Glasstec

Glasstec has always been an awesome show from a product standpoint. In the last few years, and under the direction of Birgit Horn, the event has grown to include even more new technologies and their applications. It also now involves some of the best glazing-related academics in the world. In addition to seeing the latest in new products, the show makes it easy to glimpse the future, as well. So, against that backdrop, here are some of the up and coming trends I saw to watch for in the future. More than an ounce of prevention: New technology is focused on very specific problems that commonly occur in glass. There… Read More »

A Not-So Tempered Response

Broken Glass2

I just watched another story by a TV reporter about glass. This time, the topic was tempered glass breakage. I give the reporter an A for effort, but it’s a tough concept to understand quickly and completely. It seems in this case, the tempered glass in question was in a car sunroof, but it could just as easily have been in a building or on a table. At the conclusion of the report, any rational person would ask why car makers use tempered glass in sunroofs. Heck, they might ask why we use tempered glass at all. It was another attempt to give tempered glass a bad name and yet,… Read More »

Favorite Things

It’s one of my favorite things to do at work, and it only comes once a month. And sometimes, a month even has to be skipped. But when it comes, I sure do enjoy it. Am I talking about our monthly “ice cream days” in the summer? Or the picnics on the patio? Oh no, I am talking about something that’s even more fun for me. I totally and thoroughly enjoy our monthly editor’s meeting. Led every 30 days or so by our vice president of editorial Tara Taffera, these meetings bring together the entire editorial staff to discuss the proverbial good, bad and ugly—but ultimately, to learn. We train… Read More »

A Final Bow to BAU

Bau in Munich attracted more than a quarter of a million attendees.

It’s amazing to me that more than 150,000 individuals involved in construction attended the International Builders’ Show (IBS) in Vegas and, at the same time, more than 250,000 similarly situated individuals attended the BAU (Build) construction show in Munich, Germany. I have been writing about the show quite a bit these last few weeks. Today, I want to focus on the trends in doors and windows at the show. Halls B4 and C4 were the focus for doors and windows of all types, as well as locks, fittings, access and sunshade systems. Here are some of the notable European trends most likely to make their way across the Atlantic in… Read More »

Happy Harbingers

avertotech

Everyone has his or her own indicators of the future. Whether it’s of good things to come or bad things to watch out for, we have a unique set of harbingers that we swear by. Some are solid economic indicators, and others are not—but they always prove true. Well, mine relates directly to GlassBuild America 2014, which came to a close last Thursday, and it is this: The residential growth (or contraction) of our business always preceeds the commercial. In short, if you know what’s going on with the door and window end of the business, fast forward 16-18 months, and you’ll see the same on the commercial side. Oh, the… Read More »

No Cure for This

tarandgirls

I let out a silent sigh and exhaled slowly so the sound was imperceptible to the caller on the phone. It was her again and she was calling once more to let me know she’d be late. This used to happen occasionally but it had turned into a monthly, and now almost weekly, occurrence. And she always used the same excuse.  I took a long look out the window. Yes, our vice president Tara Taffera was in a situation that no drug, alcohol or gambling rehab was going to cure. In fact, it might not be curable at all. What was I going to do with her? Now before I… Read More »

Down to the Wired

Lots of wired glass installed long ago remains in this country. This fifth floor elevator lobby skylight at the Marriott Fisherman

I have kept my tongue long enough and it’s time to let loose. I have had it with FOX News, and I am ready to tell you why.

The Leadership Thing

It really is the most elusive of qualities. It can’t be taught, yet it isn’t genetic either. So where do the qualities that make a great leader come from? And how do we get them? I’ve been pondering this question a lot in the past few weeks, especially because of an interview I recently saw on the TODAY show. The interview was in advance of this weekend’s opening of a movie about his called “Captain Phillips.” In the interview, the real-life captain of the Maersk-Alabama, who had been kidnapped by Somali pirates, talked about leadership. But the captain, Captain Richard Phillips of New England, did not respond to the question… Read More »

Has a Spring Sprung?

The residential homebuilding market has also been the bellwether of the entire construction industry. This miner’s canary, which has lain barely breathing for more than three years, has started to chirp again. I thought of this a few weeks ago, while watching a presentation at the HSG Summit in Florida by Alan Beaulieu, an economist with ITR Economics. Alan and his brother, Brian, are both economists and many years ago, Brian came up with an algorithm that he used to predict changes in the economy.  He proceeded to show a series of graphs with his modeling followed by what actually happened. By golly, he was right. Alan said that in… Read More »

X
This site uses cookies which allow us to give you the best browsing experience possible. Cookies are files stored in your browser and are used by most websites to help personalize your web experience. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. To find out more, please see our Privacy Policy.